Expert Lecture on Leprosy

An expert lecture on the disease LEPROSY was provided by Dr. Pushpendra Singh, Ass. Professor (UGC) & Ramalingaswami Fellow (DBT), Dept. of Microbiology and Biotechnology Centre, Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara (Gujarat) for the BSc B group students of Christ college, Rajkot, on the 23rd February, 2017. The expert lecture was arranged by the effort, which is taken by Dr. John J Georrge, HOD of Bioinformatics. Dr. Pushpendra Singh explained the Leprosy is one of the oldest diseases in recorded history. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the first known written reference to leprosy is from 600 B.C. It is an infectious disease that causes severe, disfiguring skin sores and nerve damage in the arms and legs. Leprosy is caused by a slow-growing type of bacteria called Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae). Leprosy is also known as Hansen's disease, after the scientist who discovered M. leprae in 1873. Leprosy is common in many countries, especially those with tropical or subtropical climates. It primarily affects the skin and the nerves outside the brain and spinal cord, called the peripheral nerves. However, it’s not as common in the United States. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease reports that only 100 to 200 new cases are diagnosed in the United States each year. Early symptoms begin in cooler areas of the body and include loss of sensation. Signs of leprosy are painless ulcers, skin lesions of hypopigmented macules, and eye damage. Later, large ulcerations, loss of digits, skin nodules, and facial disfigurement may develop, loss of digits, skin nodules, and facial disfigurement may develop lumps, or bumps that do not go away after several weeks or months. The skin sores are pale-colored. The infection is thought to be spread person to person by nasal secretions or droplets. Leprosy is rarely transmitted from chimpanzees, mangabey monkeys, and nine-banded armadillos to humans by droplets or direct contact. Antibiotics are used in the treatment of leprosy. Shockingly, there the leprosy rate in India is 60%. And scientists are still working towards it. It was by the end of the lecture that we realized that we had been discussing this topic more than an hour. It was a mind - blowing lecture and an eye opener for all the students. The students are really grateful for having given this opportunity.

Expert Lecture on Leprosy
Expert Lecture on Leprosy

Inspire 2016

Recent Events